Newsreel

It’s a slow news week, but it’s interesting to see what constitutes a slow news week in archaeology. This week sees artifacts unearthing themselves (less than medieval, but still awesome), and the grave of a mysterious warrior. Both of these finds are in Poland, which is rich with a history stretching back thousands of years. Today you’ll get a look at some of the stories that are happening there right now.  Continue reading

I got a lot of reactions to the Tolkien article in last week’s Newsreel. Most of them wondered what Tolkien has to do with medieval studies. Middle earth isn’t exactly historical, and even the commentary and metaphor in it isn’t a commentary on medieval events, but on ones contemporary to the author. So why do we, as scholars, care? It’s a good question, and the answer has to do with the study of medievalism, a growing field in the scholarship, and one that’s getting more interesting day by day.  Continue reading

Newsreel

It’s not what you think. Unless you think I’ve started subscribing to the National Geographic school of post-naming, in which case you’re a little right. There’s a lot of neat things going on in classics and medieval studies this week. For scholarship, there’s a great article on the influence of J. R. R. Tolkien, and for field archaeology we have a new insight into the archaeology of the Etruscans, and an amazing Roman mural that was just discovered in Turkey. No results on the Richard III tests yet, and I’ll ignore the controversy over his burial until we know if it’s really him or not, because that’s how we do science. Anyway… Continue reading

Resources

I know you’ve got a busy term lined up, but I’m about to make it busier, I hope. You’ve got classes, readings, and assignments, but there’s a lot of other things going on at the university. I’m going to make you aware of them, and you should go. University is an educational experience, and much of these are educational, but it’s also a social experience, and finally it’s an employment focused one. So some of these will make you smarter, some of them will make you more employable, some of them will help you make friends, and all of them will be a pretty good time. I’ve included a link to a calendar of events for the Fall term in the sidebar, and I’ll give you the highlights here.  Continue reading

Resources

If you’re looking for a quiet place to study, or a place to get some help with your Latin, look no further. In the Modern Languages building, you’ll find two rooms devoted to this task. The Classics (and Medieval) lounge in ML 245B is a second home to a lot of students, providing a great space where you can chat, sneak naps, eat lunch, and check your email. Right next door, in 245A, is the reading room, which hosts a library containing most of the seminal works in the field, and serves as a silent study room.  Continue reading

Newsreel

Not just my Hot Hot Heat cover band or an amazing B movie title anymore! This week’s Newsreel starts in England with a curse scroll, and tours the world to bring you dog archaeologists from Australia and baby volcanoes in Germany. Strange things are afoot in the world of classical studies, but have no fear, the gods will protect us from the curses of the volcano dogs! Continue reading

Medieval Cat

Dear parents,

You’ve been waiting a while for your child to declare their major, and you may be surprised when they come home for the summer and tell you that it’s classical studies. You were probably hoping for accounting, business, or even engineering, and you’re not sure how it’s different from a regular history degree. You’re worried about their future, and the consequences this choice might have on their employability. I understand. I’m writing this letter to tell you that you don’t have to worry, and I’ll tell you why.  Continue reading